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Logan students shine in Creative Generations-Bangarra Dance Project

Published: 26 August 2015

Logan students shine in Creative Generations-Bangarra Dance Project

Support from the Logan: City of Choice Leadership Team meant 25 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students from five Logan City high schools were able to participate in this year's Creative Generations-Bangarra Dance Program.

The Leadership Team provided $2,200 to help fund rehearsals at the Logan Entertainment Centre, making the program more accessible to local students. Logan City Council also provided support through subsidised venue hire.

Students from Beenleigh State High School, Kingston College, Mabel Park State High School, Marsden State High School and Springwood State High School performed as part of the 50-stong South East Region entry at the Creative Generations Showcase at the Brisbane Convention Centre in July.

The Creative Generations-Bangarra Dance Program is an annual initiative for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander secondary school students. This year, it involved three weeks of workshops and rehearsals, culminating in a large scale, high profile performance at the Brisbane Convention Centre on 16-17 July 2015 featuring young dancers from throughout Queensland.

The annual program encourages cultural connection between students and Elders from local areas in the South East Region. Through this experience, the students grow in confidence in their own communities and help their schools to develop culturally appropriate and authentic relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. The program is supported by Education Queensland.

During this year's workshops and rehearsals, students participated in an intensive dance-based program for secondary students, exploring 'who you are' and 'where you come from'. The participants researched and gathered stories with help and guidance from Elders to develop dance, performance and creative skills to produce dance theatre.

This year's theme was 'One Mob on Sacred Ground', reflecting the diversity of the Aboriginal culture in the South East Region.

The piece represented the ceremonial ground on which all clans gather to celebrate. It depicted the significance of the elements of fire, water and earth. The dancers came together to celebrate and acknowledge their ancestors as they cleansed themselves through the smoking ceremony and took that knowledge into the future.