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Dwelling House

The information below will assist with residential projects such as building a home, secondary dwelling (e.g. granny flat), outbuilding (e.g. shed, carport), or extensions.  It also includes information related to other projects on a residential property, such as starting a home business, erecting an advertising device, driveway crossovers, and plumbing services.  For two dwellings on separate titles (e.g. duplex) please see Dual Occupancy.

Select the part of the picture you would like more information on.

House (including house extension)

A Dwelling House is a residential use of premises for one household that contains a single dwelling.  It includes domestic out-buildings (e.g. carport, shed) and works normally associated with a dwelling (e.g. an extension), and may include a secondary dwelling (e.g. a granny flat).  For two dwellings with separate titles (e.g. duplexes), please see Dual Occupancy.

For more information refer to the Dwelling House and Secondary Dwelling Fact Sheet (PDF 39 KB) and the Dual Occupancy (Auxiliary Unit) and Dwelling House Assessment Checksheet (PDF 889 KB). The use of the checksheet will make the preparation of these applications easier as well as reducing Council's assessment timeframes.

Dwelling Houses (and extensions) are either:

  • Accepted development - no permit/approval is required if the proposed development complies with all of the acceptable outcomes of the applicable codes from the Logan Planning Scheme; or
  • Code assessable - a development application will need to be submitted to Council for assessment.   For the initial construction of a house or a secondary dwelling, a Material Change of Use development application is required. For other projects associated with the house after the house is built (e.g. an extension or shed), a Building Works Assessable against the Planning Scheme development application will be used.

Please see Development in Logan for more information about determining the category of development and assessment (accepted development or code assessable) for your proposed development and, if applicable, the required application forms and fees.

Carport / shed

Where a residential property already has a dwelling house on it, any further improvements to the property which do not materially change the use or scale of use on the premises are known as building works.   These commonly include projects such as building a shed, carport, house extension or swimming pool.

For more information about sheds, carports and garages please refer to the Domestic Outbuildings Fact Sheet (PDF 41 KB).

In most instances these types of works are accepted development and do not require approval from Council. Specifically, building works are either:

  • Accepted development - no permit/approval from Council is required if the proposed development complies with all of the acceptable outcomes of the applicable codes from the Logan Planning Scheme;  or
  • Code assessable - a development application (Building Works Assessable against the Planning Scheme - BWAP) will need to be submitted to Council.

Please use the Dual Occupancy (Auxiliary Unit) and Dwelling House Assessment Checksheet (PDF 889 KB) to review the assessment benchmarks, noting that carports, sheds, patios and other non-habitable structures ancillary to the dwelling house are categorised as Domestic Outbuildings (PDF 41 KB).   If approval from Council is required, please include the completed checksheet with the application to make the assessment process more efficient.

Please note that Building approval, which can be obtained from a private building certifier, is required regardless of whether or not approval from Council is needed.

For more information refer to the Dwelling House and Secondary Dwelling Fact Sheet (PDF 39 KB). Please see Development in Logan for more information about determining the category of development and assessment (accepted development or code assessable) for your project and, if applicable, the required application fees and lodgement process.

Secondary dwelling / auxiliary unit

Secondary dwellings and Auxiliary units provide housing choice and affordability and are:

  • Self-contained and compact in form;
  • Located beside, behind, below or above an existing or new dwelling;
  • Attached to the primary dwelling or detached (free standing);
  • On the same lot and have the same owner (i.e. cannot be subdivided or separately titled); and
  • Not subject to infrastructure charges.

For more information please refer to An Introduction to Auxiliary Units and Secondary Dwellings (PDF 1278 KB). If the development is a dual occupancy with separate titles (two dwellings on one lot with independent households, e.g. duplex), please refer to Dual Occupancy.

The difference between a Secondary Dwelling and an Auxiliary Unit is:

  • Secondary Dwelling:
    • Is used in conjunction with and subordinate to the primary dwelling house; and
    • Must be occupied by persons who form one household with the primary dwelling;
    • For example:  older parents/relatives or teenage children living in a granny flat or self-contained section/wing/floor of the main house.
  • Auxiliary Unit:
    • May be occupied by different households e.g. the auxiliary unit could be rented out independently to the primary dwelling (i.e. to someone else); and
    • Has constraints including:
      • A maximum of two bedrooms, one kitchen, one living space, one driveway crossover; and
      • Size limits:
        • 70m² if in the residential zone category (Low Density Residential Zone, Low-medium Density Residential Zone or Medium Density Residential Zone) and on a lot less than 1,000m²; or
        • 100m² otherwise.

Secondary Dwellings and Dual Occupancy (Auxiliary Units) are either:

  • Accepted development - no permit/approval is required if the proposed development complies with all of the acceptable outcomes of the applicable codes from the Logan Planning Scheme;  or
  • Code assessable - a development application (Material Change of Use) will need to be submitted to Council for assessment.

Please see Development in Logan for more information about determining the category of development and assessment (accepted development or code assessable) and if applicable the required application forms and fees.

Buying a house / property in Logan

When buying a house or property some things to consider include:

  • What zone the property is in and if any overlays (constraints) apply.  Refer to Logan Interactive Mapping to search for a property and print a report of zoning and overlay information (including any applicable local plans).
  • What zone the neighbouring blocks are in, to identify what could be done (built, developed) next door, or down the street (use Logan Interactive Mapping).
  • If the house has building and plumbing approvals (refer to Building and Plumbing Information Sheet).
  • If there are any approvals nearby that have not commenced, to determine what is going to be built / developed in the neighbourhood.  Use PD Online to conduct a Development Enquiry.
  • Further helpful information about buying or selling a property in Logan.

Subdividing (reconfiguring a lot)

Reconfiguring a Lot includes:

  • Creating lots by subdividing another lot,
  • Amalgamating 2 or more lots,
  • Boundary realignment, and/or
  • Creating an easement giving access to a constructed road.

To determine if a particular property may be subdivided, the area of the lot and applicable zone, precinct and local plan need to be identified.

Reconfiguring a lot is either code assessable or impact assessable, both of which require a development application to be lodged with Council. Infrastructure charges will apply where development increases demand on trunk infrastructure, and are generally payable before approval of the plan of subdivision.  

Please refer to Council's checklist of subdivision project costs to help identify all potentially applicable fees and charges - the document is provided as a downloadable spreadsheet (Microsoft Excel format) where applicable information can be entered and formulae are used to calculate an estimated total cost.

Development in Logan provides more information about determining the zone and overlays for a property of interest and the required development application and fees.

Home based business

Home Based Businesses are dwellings first and foremost and businesses second.

Generally, Home Based Businesses are small scale, operated by the residents of the dwelling and do not need more than two non-resident employees.  Examples include bed and breakfast, farm stay, home office, home based Child Care.  It does not include an office, shop, warehouse, transport depot or a hobby.

For more information refer to the Home Based Business Fact Sheet (PDF 43 KB).

Home Based Businesses may be:

  • Accepted development - no permit/approval required if it complies with all of the acceptable outcomes of the applicable codes from the Logan Planning Scheme; or
  • Code assessable - a development application (Material Change of Use) will need to be submitted to Council;  or
  • Impact assessable - as per code assessable, and a more holistic assessment process is required, including a public notification stage.

Please see Development in Logan for more information about determining the category of assessment (code or impact) for your proposed development, and if applicable the required application forms and fees.

Advertising device

An Advertising Device is any permanent structure, device, sign or the like intended for advertising purposes.  It does not include temporary, inflatable or portable signs (e.g. real estate signs on premises for sale/lease, garage sale, promotion of community events (e.g. fetes/markets, sporting event)).

An Advertising Device may be:

  • Accepted development - no permit/approval required if:
    • It complies with all of the acceptable outcomes of the applicable codes (Advertising Device Code) from the Logan Planning Scheme, AND
    • It is an on-premise sign on a lot which does not have a frontage to a State Controlled road (please refer to the Queensland DA Mapping System, and look under SARA Layers, Transport & Infrastructure for State Controlled Roads);
    • OR
  • Code assessable - if the device does not comply with the relevant acceptable outcomes, a development application (Operational Works) will need to be submitted to Council for assessment;  OR
  • Code or impact assessable - if the device is an off-premises sign, depending on the zone, it may be code or impact assessable (the latter requires a public notification stage).

Please see Development in Logan for more information about determining the category of assessment (code or impact) and if applicable, the required application forms and fees.

Driveway crossover

A driveway crossover is the part of an accessway which is located between the edge of the road seal and the property boundary.

Driveways and crossovers may be accepted development (no development application required) if:

  • They comply with the requirements of the Logan Planning Scheme (see Policy 5 - Infrastructure, specifically section 3.4.5 Design Standards for Access and Driveways), to ensure safe vehicle access to allotments; and
  • They are not located on a State-Controlled road (please refer to the Queensland DA mapping system and look under SARA Layers, Transport & Infrastructure for State Controlled Roads).

Should the driveway not satisfy one or both of the above points, it will become code assessable, requiring a development application (Operational Works) to be lodged with Council.   If the proposal is unable to comply with Planning Scheme Policy 5, it will be required to demonstrate that the driveway crossover is safe, functional and does not adversely impact infrastructure.

Plumbing services

If I require a plumbing application, what is the fee?Refer to Development Assessment's fees and charges (PDF 2981 KB).
What do I need to lodge a plumbing application?

The following requirements exist for the lodgement of a plumbing application:

The plumbing and drainage application can be submitted via one of the following methods.

What do I do if I am selling my house & have been advised that it does not have a final plumbing inspection?

If the house was built prior to 1998, complete a Building/Plumbing and Drainage Work Visual Compliance Inspection Form .


If there is an existing plumbing application but no final inspection carried out, the owner or new responsible person must book a final inspection (a reinspection fee of $150.00 may apply).Contact Plumbing Services on 07 3412 4840.

If the dwelling has had no inspections, a Property Inspection Report must be completed.Complete the Application for Residential Property Information (PS1) form (PDF 247 KB).

For more information on building and plumbing when buying or selling a house, refer to the Building and Plumbing Information Fact Sheet (PDF 147 KB).

How long will my application take to be assessed?
  • New domestic sewered dwelling on vacant land – Fastrack (2 business days)
  • Non-sewered domestic dwelling on vacant land – 20 business days
  • Commercial application – 20 business days
How do I get a copy of my house drainage plans?

To obtain domestic as constructed plans, the following needs to be undertaken:

How do I book a plumbing inspection?Please contact Plumbing Services on 07 3412 4840 before 2pm to book a next day inspection, with your plumbing and drainage (PD) application number available for easy reference. (A $150.00 for reinspection fee may be required).
Who deals with water meters/sub meters?Please contact council's Customer Service Branch on 07 3412 3412 for a request to be forwarded to Water Operations.

Building certification

A building development approval (certification), known as a building permit, is required prior to commencing construction on most types of domestic or commercial building works.

These can be sought from a private building certifier. A building certifier will assess whether the proposed work complies with the Building Act 1975 and associated regulations and building standards. Please note that Council does not offer building certification services.

All building certifiers must be registered with the Queensland Building and Construction Commission.

For more information, please see Building.