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Infrastructure Planning & Charges

The Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP) identifies the trunk infrastructure (e.g. water supply, sewer, stormwater, transport, parks) necessary to serve urban development at the Desired Standard of Service (DSS) in a coordinated, efficient and financially sustainable manner.

Council uses the LGIP when assessing development applications, for example, to establish if conditions for necessary trunk infrastructure or extra payments can be imposed.  Infrastructure charges for the development are calculated in accordance with the provisions of the Logan Charges Resolution (PDF 2102 KB).

To learn more about Council’s infrastructure plan and charges please refer to the sections below.

Trunk infrastructure

Trunk infrastructure is higher order infrastructure that supports large areas or catchments.  Typical examples of trunk infrastructure include water treatment facilities, sewerage treatment plants, and collector or higher order roads.  By comparison, non-trunk infrastructure is infrastructure internal to a development, or infrastructure that connects a development to the external infrastructure network.

Trunk infrastructure is classified into the following networks:

  • Water supply
  • Sewer
  • Stormwater
  • Movement (transport - road, cycle)
  • Parks
  • Land for community facilities.

Infrastructure planning

Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP)

The Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP) identifies the trunk infrastructure necessary to serve urban development at the desired standard of service (DSS) in a coordinated, efficient and financially sustainable manner. The LGIP forms part of the Logan Planning Scheme:

  • Part 4 presents a summary of the projected demand and the desired standards of service (DSS), and lists the extrinsic material.
  • Schedule 3 presents the projections, the schedules of work (SoW) and the maps.

All documentation and extrinsic material relating to the preparation of the LGIP can be viewed on the LGIP Documentation page .

Prior to June 2014, Queensland planning legislation required local governments to have a Priority Infrastructure Plan (PIP) in their planning schemes.  This transitioned to the LGIP in June 2014, with the intent being similar in showing the trunk infrastructure Council plans to provide to serve urban development at the desired standard of service in a coordinated, efficient and financially sustainable manner. Key differences between the PIP and LGIP include:

  • The LGIP must be financially affordable, and Council must provide evidence that the trunk infrastructure included in the LGIP can be funded.
  • The planning period for the PIP was 2009 to 2021, whereas the LGIP has a planning period of 2014 to 2026; and
  • The establishment cost of the items in the PIP is expressed in net present value (NPV), whereas the LGIP is expressed in current cost terms (base date 2014).

Infrastructure charges

Under Queensland's planning legislation, local councils may require developers to contribute towards the provision of trunk infrastructure networks identified in the Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP). Logan City Council levies infrastructure charges according to the Logan Charges Resolution (No. 6) Version 5 2018 (PDF 2102 KB) ('the Resolution'), which commenced on 3 April 2018.  The Resolution is made in accordance with the Planning Act 2016, which sets out certain requirements for infrastructure charges including maximum charges that can be applied for different types of residential and non-residential development.

The Resolution provides clarity on Council's policy position related to the following matters:

  • The criteria to be applied in deciding if development infrastructure is trunk infrastructure (in trunk infrastructure conversion applications);
  • The method to be applied for working out the establishment cost of trunk infrastructure for a refund or offset where an applicant is required under a condition of a development approval to provide land or works for trunk infrastructure;
  • Whether an offset or refund applies, and if so, the details of the offset and refund and the timing of the offset and refund.

To understand more about the changes introduced to the Resolution in Version 5 (as well as in previous versions 1, 2 and 3) please see Summary of Changes (PDF 40 KB).

The charge area maps are available below, and include the Priority Infrastructure Area (PIA).

Residential Charge Area Maps:

Non-residential Charge Area Map:

Infrastructure Charges Estimate

To understand what infrastructure charges apply to a proposed development:

Application forms and fact sheets

Application Forms:

Fact Sheets:

Development monitoring (for future infrastructure needs)

By 2031 the City of Logan will have a population of approximately 420,000 residents and will provide 130,000 jobs.   Logan City Council is working hard to prepare for this growth.

In order to understand the future infrastructure needs of the Logan community, Council forecasts future housing and employment growth, and compares it with actual "on the ground" development to ensure infrastructure is provided in the right place at the right time.

Development monitoring reports are available for:

  • December 2016 (PDF 2848 KB) - residential and non-residential development across key fronts in Logan in December 2016, compared to projections for June 2021 (forecasts 4.5 years ahead).   This includes a fact sheet with a summary of residential and non-residential development, demonstrating significant growth in the number of new dwellings created, driven by lots within staged residential estates being sealed in the reporting period July - December 2016. Most new approved non-residential development occurred in the light industry sector.
  • June 2016 (PDF 1078 KB) - residential development across key development fronts in Logan as at June 2016, compared to projections for June 2016.  A fact sheet is included which provides a summary of residential (with significant approvals in Greenbank, Park Ridge and Browns Plains) and non-residential development (with most activity in the retail and light industry sectors).
  • December 2015 (PDF 1055 KB) - residential development across key fronts in Logan in December 2015, compared to projections for June 2016 (forecast 6 month ahead)
  • June 2015 (PDF 313 KB) - residential development across key fronts in Logan in June 2015, compared to projections for June 2016 (forecasts a year ahead).

The development monitoring data is also available for review, download and/or analysis on Council's Open data portal (use the search keyword 'projection' to find the Non-Residential and Residential Development vs Projection datasets).

Previous infrastructure charging instruments

 
DateEvent
21 July 2017Logan Charges Resolution (No 6) Version 4 2017 (PDF 1840 KB) came into effect.
3 July 2017Logan Charges Resolution (No 6) Version 3 2017 (PDF 1476 KB) came into effect.
26 May 2017Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.6) Version 2 2017 (PDF 1487 KB) came into effect.
1 March 2017Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.6)  Version 1 2017   (PDF 1473 KB) came into effect.
18 May 2015

Logan Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 5) 2015 (PDF 4928 KB) came into effect.

17 September 2014Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 4) Version 2 2013 (PDF 1369 KB) came into effect.
4 July 2014

Sustainable Planning (Infrastructure Charges) and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2014 commenced.

Statutory Guideline 03/14 - Local government infrastructure plans

1 July 2013Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 4) 2013 (PDF 579 KB) came into effect.
1 July 2012Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.3) 2012 (PDF 595 KB) came into effect.
6 December 2011Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.2) 2011 (PDF 3192 KB) came into effect.
1 July 2011Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 1) 2011 (PDF 5303 KB) came into effect. 

June 2011

Amendment to the Desired Standards of Service for the Parks and Land for Community Facilities network

The Desired Standards of Service (DSS) for trunk infrastructure networks, including that for the Parks and Land for Community Facilities network, is provided in the Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP - Part 4 of the Logan Planning Scheme 2015). The purpose of the DSS in the LGIP is to provide a high level summary of the key planning and design standards, which are provided in Planning Scheme Policy 5 (PSP 5) – Infrastructure.

Council proposes to amend the DSS as provided in the LGIP (Desired Standards of Service Interim LGIP Amendment (PDF 96 KB)) and the key planning and design standards provided in PSP 5 (Desired Standards of Service Planning Scheme Policy Amendment). (PDF 129 KB)

The goal of the amendment is to improve the DSS for the Parks and Land for Community Facilities network.  This will enable the network to serve the community in a manner that is more efficient and financially sustainable.

Council is currently reviewing submissions received during public consultation and must decide whether to proceed with the amendment or not.

Description of the changes to the DSS

The proposed changes to the existing DSS are described below:

Parks

Recreation park

The most significant changes are:

  • Rate of Provision – It is proposed to have a single provision that applies across the city rather than separate provisions for the Urban, Growth and Rural Regions.
  • Accessibility – It is proposed that the current maximum distance be increased and that a minimum distance between parks be included.  This will prevent the over concentration of Local Parks in Growth areas and ensure that District and Metro Parks, which provide recreational functions, are not located in close proximity to Local parks.
  • Functional Areas – The amended DSS proposes separate recreational functions for a park i.e. “Activity Areas” and “Kick-About Space”. The Activity Area would be complemented by a mandatory Kick-about Space, which together provide the recreation function for the park. Activity Areas may include embellishments such as a playground, dog-off leash area, fitness equipment, picnic facility or other similar facilities that provide the community with diverse park functions within a catchment. Kick-about Space is generally open areas within the park which are relatively flat (30 x 50m min) with turf to allow for more active pursuits. The DSS establishes the minimum size requirements for these areas (e.g. Local Recreation Park has 20% as Activity Area and 40% as Kick-about Space).
  • Flood Immunity – The amended DSS allow for different levels of flood immunity depending on the types of activities within the parks.  For example, the “Activity Area” has a flood immunity of 100% as this part of the park will be embellished and used intensively.

    Note:  The minimum park areas have not changed as it is comparable with that of other councils.

Sport park

The most significant changes are:

  • Provision – It is proposed to have a single provision that applies across the city rather than separate provisions for the Urban, Growth and Rural Regions.
  • Accessibility – The accessibility for District Sport Park has changed to include a minimum distance between other Sport Parks of 2.5km. This avoids the over provision of Sport Parks.
  • Area – It is proposed to change the minimum area for a District Sport Parks 10ha, and that for a Metropolitan Sport Park at 15ha.
  • Flood Immunity – It is proposed to reduce the area of land above the 50 year flood from 75% of the park to 50%.  The exact area of the sport park that has to be flood free depends on its function.  As an example, club houses and significant embellishments must be located above the 100 year flood level, premier fields (including artificial playing surfaces for games such as tennis, soccer, netball and hockey) must be above the 50 year, and secondary fields and ovals above the 10 year flood level.

Land for Community Facilities

The proposed changes to this component of the network are minor, with the most important being:

  • A clear differentiation for ‘Community Services’ between the rate of provision for the local, district and metro levels.
  • At the metro level, an increase in the rate of provision from 1 facility per 150,000 people to 1 per 250,000 people for
    • Performing Arts space or Facility;
    • Convention / Exhibition centres;
    • Art Gallery; and
    • Museums
  • An increase in the rate of provision for 1 facility per 100,000 to 1 facility for 150,000 for Indoor Sport Metro.
  • The land size for Museum and Convention / Exhibition centre be reduced by 1,000m2 and 5,000m2 respectively (the size of the building however remain the same).

Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP) review checklist

This amendment only involves the DSS for the Parks and Land for Community Facilities, and only those sections of the LGIP review checklist   (PDF 62 KB) that deal with this matter have been completed (i.e. requirement numbers 33 to 36).

Frequently asked questions

Q1: What is trunk infrastructure?

A: Trunk infrastructure is significant infrastructure (land and/or works) that can service broader catchments and is typically shared between different developments.

Q2: What are Desired Standards of Service (DSS)?

A: The Desired Standards of Service (DSS) are used to plan trunk infrastructure networks.  As an example, a DSS may indicate the minimum size of a park.

Q3: Why is Council amending the DSS for the Parks and Land for Community Facilities Networks?

A: The goal of the amendment is to improve the DSS for the Parks and Land for Community Facilities network.  This will enable the network to serve the community in a manner that is more efficient and financially sustainable.

Q4: What types of parks does Logan City Council provide?

A: Logan City Council boasts many beautiful parks that offer a range of facilities and provide for different recreational and sporting activities including:

  • Recreation (local, district, metropolitan, and corridor recreation); and
  • Sport (district and metropolitan).

Q5: What types of community facilities does Logan City Council provide?

A: Logan City Council provides a range of community facilities to meet the needs of current and future residents including:

  • General community spaces;
  • Community centres;
  • Convention/Exhibition centres;
  • Libraries;
  • Art galleries;
  • Performing arts spaces;
  • Museums;
  • Indoor sports facilities; and
  • Aquatic centres.

Further information

For further information about infrastructure planning and charging please contact Council by: