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Infrastructure Planning & Charges

The Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP) identifies the trunk infrastructure necessary to serve urban development at the desired standard of service (DSS) in a coordinated, efficient and financially sustainable manner.

Trunk infrastructure is higher order infrastructure that supports large areas or catchments.  Typical examples of trunk infrastructure include water treatment facilities, sewerage treatment plants, and collector or higher order roads.  By comparison, non-trunk infrastructure is infrastructure internal to a development, or infrastructure that connects a development to the external infrastructure network.

Trunk infrastructure is classified into the following networks:

  • Water supply
  • Sewer
  • Stormwater
  • Movement (transport - road, cycle)
  • Parks
  • Land for community facilities.

Council uses the LGIP when assessing development applications to, for example, establish if conditions for necessary trunk infrastructure or extra payment conditions can be imposed. 

Infrastructure charges for the development are calculated in accordance with the provisions of the Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution in effect at the time.  

To learn more about Council’s LGIP and the Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution, please refer to the sections below.

Infrastructure Planning

Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP)

The LGIP identifies the trunk infrastructure necessary to serve urban development at the desired standard of service (DSS) in a coordinated, efficient and financially sustainable manner. The LGIP forms Part 4 (Local government infrastructure plan) and Schedule 3 (Local government infrastructure plan mapping and tables) of the Logan Planning Scheme. Part 4 presents a summary of the projected demand and the DSS, and lists the extrinsic material.  Schedule 3 presents the projections, the schedules of work (SoW) and the maps.

All documentation and extrinsic material relating to the preparation of the LGIP can be viewed on the LGIP Documentation page .  

Difference between the Priority Infrastructure Plan (PIP) and the Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP)

The Sustainable Planning Act 2009 (SPA) prior to June 2014, required that local government has a PIP in its planning scheme. The amended SPA, which came into effect in June 2014 requires that local government has a LGIP in its planning scheme.

The intent of the PIP and LGIP is similar, in that it shows the trunk infrastructure Council plans to provide to serve urban development at the desired standard of service in a coordinated, efficient and financially sustainable manner. However, a number of the requirements are different.  The most important difference is that the LGIP must be financially affordable.

Essentially, this means that Council has to provide evidence that it can fund the trunk infrastructure included in the LGIP.

The other differences are:

  • The planning period for the PIP was 2009 to 2021, whereas the LGIP has a planning period of 2014 to 2026; and
  • The establishment cost of the items in the PIP is expressed in net present value (NPV), whereas the LGIP is expressed in current cost terms (based date 2014).

Infrastructure Charges Estimate

To understand what infrastructure charges apply to a proposed development:

Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 6) Version 2 2017

The Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 6)  Version 2 2017 (PDF 1487 KB) ('the Resolution') commenced on 26 May 2017.

The Resolution is in accordance with the Sustainable Planning Act 2009, which sets out certain requirements for infrastructure charges including maximum charges that can be applied for different types of residential and non-residential development. The Resolution provides clarity on Council's policy position related to the following matters:

  • The criteria to be applied in deciding if development infrastructure is trunk infrastructure (in trunk infrastructure conversion applications);
  • The method to be applied for working out the establishment cost of trunk infrastructure for a refund or offset where an applicant is required under a condition of a development approval to provide land or works for trunk infrastructure;
  • Whether an offset or refund applies, and if so, the details of the offset and refund and the timing of the offset and refund.

The main inclusions and changes in the Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.6) Version 2 2017 (PDF 1487 KB) are:

  • Deferring infrastructure charges for Mixed Use Development in the Springwood Economic Development Zone - this is a new policy introduced by Council which allows up to $1 million dollars worth of infrastructure charges to be deferred for eligible new Mixed Use Development in the Springwood Economic Development Zone. This policy aims to transform Springwood into the next CBD in South East Queensland. 
  • Charge Area Maps - the water, wastewater, stormwater, and non-residential charge area maps in Schedules 3 and 5 of the Resolution have been amended to be consistent with the service catchment area maps in the LGIP. 
  • 20% on-cost - the on-cost percentages (planning, design, project management) stated in Table 1 Schedule 10 of the Resolution have been revised to be the same as the on-cost used in the LGIP.

The other policy changes incorporated as part of the Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 6) Version 1 2017 in 1 March 2017 are still valid and include the following:

  • Promoting employment growth within the City's Centre, Mixed Use, Low Impact Industry, Medium Impact Industry, and Specialised Centre Zones by exempting non-residential developments from paying infrastructure charges where the development is within an existing building and does not involve additional gross floor area. The maximum exemption would be capped at a total of $50,000.
  • Encouraging the development of new high-quality 4-5 star hotel developments within the City of Logan by deferring the payment of their infrastructure charges.
  • Supporting the community by incorporating an updated version of the not-for-profit and charitable organisations infrastructure charges deferral policy into the resolution.
  • Including conversion criteria to provide guidance and transparency when assessing applications to convert non-trunk infrastructure to trunk infrastructure.  
  • Cutting red tape by introducing the ability for applicants to submit valuations upfront as part of the Development Assessment process if they are entitled to infrastructure charges offsets or refunds.
  • Replacing the current capped infrastructure charge rates with the new State Government’s capped rates released in July 2016.
  • Introducing an automatic increase provision to provide Council the ability to index levied charges in accordance with the Sustainable Planning Act 2009.

Charge Area Maps

Please note that the Priority Infrastructure Area (PIA) is reflected within the maps attached below.

Residential Charge Areas:

Non-residential Charge Areas:

Application Forms and Fact Sheets

Application Forms:

Fact Sheets:

Development Monitoring

By 2031 the City of Logan will have a population of approximately 420,000 residents and will provide 130,000 jobs.   Logan City Council is working hard to prepare for this growth.

In order to understand the future infrastructure needs of the Logan community, Council forecasts future housing and employment growth, and compares it with actual "on the ground" development to ensure infrastructure is provided in the right place at the right time.

Development monitoring reports are available for:

  • December 2016 (PDF 2848 KB) - residential and non-residential development across key fronts in Logan in December 2016, compared to projections for June 2021 (forecasts 4.5 years ahead).   This includes a fact sheet with a summary of residential and non-residential development, demonstrating significant growth in the number of new dwellings created, driven by lots within staged residential estates being sealed in the reporting period July - December 2016. Most new approved non-residential development occurred in the light industry sector.
  • June 2016 (PDF 1078 KB) - residential development across key development fronts in Logan as at June 2016, compared to projections for June 2016.  A fact sheet is included which provides a summary of residential (with significant approvals in Greenbank, Park Ridge and Browns Plains) and non-residential development (with most activity in the retail and light industry sectors).
  • December 2015 (PDF 1055 KB) - residential development across key fronts in Logan in December 2015, compared to projections for June 2016 (forecast 6 month ahead)
  • June 2015 (PDF 313 KB) - residential development across key fronts in Logan in June 2015, compared to projections for June 2016 (forecasts a year ahead).

The development monitoring data is also available for review, download and/or analysis on Council's Open data portal (use the search keyword 'projection' to find the Non-Residential and Residential Development vs Projection datasets).

Previous Infrastructure Charging Instruments

 
DateEvent
1 March 2017Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.6)  Version 1 2017   (PDF 1473 KB) came into effect.
18 May 2015

Logan Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 5) 2015 (PDF 4928 KB) came into effect.

17 September 2014Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 4) Version 2 2013 (PDF 1369 KB) came into effect.
4 July 2014

Sustainable Planning (Infrastructure Charges) and Other Legislation Amendment Bill 2014 commenced.

Statutory Guideline 03/14 - Local government infrastructure plans

1 July 2013Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 4) 2013 (PDF 579 KB) came into effect.
1 July 2012Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.3) 2012 (PDF 595 KB) came into effect.
6 December 2011Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No.2) 2011 (PDF 3192 KB) came into effect.
1 July 2011Logan Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 1) 2011 (PDF 5303 KB) came into effect. 

June 2011

Further Information

For further information about infrastructure planning and charging please refer to Council's
Fact Sheet - Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 6) Version 2 2017 (PDF 34 KB) or contact Council by: