Anita Heiss transcript

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Text on screen:

The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

Wendy Barling:

The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

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Deadly Digital Communities logo with handprint.

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Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

Robert Ah Wing:

Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

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Our words our stories

A Wiradjuri language story by Anita Heiss

Recorded on the 6th of September 2019

Robert Ah Wing:

Our words our stories

A Wiradjuri language story by Anita Heiss

Recorded on the 6th of September 2019.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri

A language story by Anita Heiss.

Anita Heiss: ­

Anita greets listeners in the Wiradjuri language.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

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Anita is one of Australia’s most prolific and well-known authors.  As Professor of Communication at the University of Queensland, she teaches creative writing, mentors students and develops the BlackWords research community. She is a Lifetime Ambassador of the Indigenous Literacy Foundation. Anita regularly visits libraries in the City of Logan for author talks. 

Anita Heiss: ­

G'day everyone. I'm Anita Heiss and I have Wiradjuri belonging from Erambie and from Brungle, and my mob are the Williamses. I have respect for my elders, for those who have passed on, my ancestors and Wiradjuri country. I care deeply for my Wiradjuri family, Wiradjuri land and reclamation of Wiradjuri language, which I've only been learning since January 2018.

When I enrolled in the Grad Cert Certificate in Wiradjuri Language, Culture and Heritage course with Uncle Stan Grant, at Charles Sturt University, I just thought it was the most empowering moment of my life. Uncle Stan has trained some amazing human beings as well, including my teachers, Lloyd Dolan, Letitia Harris and Harry Lambshead, and they teach a mob from all around where Wiradjuri country, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

Being in that classroom, related to many people in the course, is such a privilege and a joy. When I fly into Wagga, my spirit lifts immediately. We often go down to the Murrumbidgee and just sit or we have a swim.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Wagga Wagga

Pronounced: Wog-uh wog-uh

Means: Dance, dancing, celebrating

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

Actually, many people believe that Wagga Wagga meant the place of many crows, but the word Wagga actually means ‘dance’. And only recently in 2019, Wagga local Council accepted that Wagga Wagga actually means ‘dancing’ or ‘celebrating’.

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Wiradjuri: Wagadhaany

Pronounced: Wagga-dine

Means: Dancer

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

In fact, my new novel that comes out in 2020 is called River of Dreams, and the main character in that novel, her name is Wagadhaany which means ‘dancer’.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri

A language story by Anita Heiss.

Anita Heiss: ­

On the first day of my language course, I was overwhelmed. I thought, I'm never going to be able to do this. You have to actually forget everything that you ever learned in English, because Wiradjuri has its own grammar system and it's a very, very complex language. And the reality is, I will probably never master it in my lifetime. But I'm really lucky, as are any Wiradjuri people who want to learn the language, because we have loads of resources. Many of them were gifted to me by Uncle Stan Grant including the Wiradjuri dictionary, the grammar book, we have song books, we have DVDs and CDs. We also have card games in Wiradjuri. Some of you will know that card game, Go Fish, we've got a Wiradjuri version of that.

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On the left side of the screen is a map, showing Central New South Wales and highlighting the location of Wiradjuri country. The text on the screen reads ‘Wiradjuri Country NSW.’

Anita Heiss: ­

And for those of you who are listening but don't know where Wiradjuri country is, it crosses a vast area of Central New South Wales. Towns like Dubbo, Condobolin, Orange, Bathurst,  Wagga Wagga, as I mentioned, Albury, Narrandera, Griffith and of course, where my family are from, Cowra, Brungle and Tumut and everywhere in between.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri

A language story by Anita Heiss.

Anita Heiss: ­

For me, learning and speaking language, even though I know very little, is incredibly empowering. Speaking language for me, particularly in a public space, is an act of sovereignty. It says that I have the power, and I have the right to my culture, and I will demonstrate it when I want to, because I'm proud. I hope that lots of other people around Australia have the opportunity for such empowerment through learning language. Before I go today, I want to share with you 10 of my most used and favourite words and maybe you can find them in the language of your local area. If not, you can use mine!

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Yiradhu marang

Pronounced: Yirra-doo mah-rung

Means: Good day

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

So I started today by saying ‘yiradhu marang’ and that basically means ‘Good day’!

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri:       Mandaang guwu

Pronounced: Mun-dung goo

Means:           Thank you

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

I use this word, this phrase every day: ‘mandaang guwu’. I tweeted out in my tweets, ‘mandaang guwu’ is simply ‘thank you’.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Yindyammarra

Pronounced: Yin-dja-murra

Means: Respect

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

I sign off many of my emails, particularly to colleagues with the word ‘yindyammarra’. ‘Yindyammarra’ means, ‘respect’, ‘the act of respect’, ‘the act of honouring’. It also means to be polite, to do something gently and slowly. So what we try to do as Wiradjuri people is live ‘yindyammara’, live respectfully.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Nguram-bang

Pronounced: New-rum-bung

Means: Country

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

You would have heard when I introduced myself the word ‘nguram-bang’. That actually means ‘country’. So I use that word when I'm talking about my land.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Miyagan

Pronounced: Me-yah-garn

Means: Family

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

My ‘family’ is ‘miyagan’.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Mingaan
Pronounced: Ming-arn
Means: Older sister

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

My ‘sisters’, any, any female friends that I call sister, if they're older than me, they are called ‘mingaan’, ‘mingaan’.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, proudly smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Minhi

Pronounced: Min-ee

Means: Younger sister

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

And my ‘younger sisters’, all the girls in my life that are younger than I am, they are ‘minhi’ -  ‘minhi’.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Ngurrbul

Means: Love or friendship

Pronounced: Nurrrr-bool

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

We have a number of words for ‘love’ but the one you use, I use with friends, so it's for ‘friendship’ but it means, you know, ‘love of friends’ is ‘ngurrbul’.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Balgabalgar-galang

Pronounced: Bul-guh-bul-gah-gar-lung

Means: Elders

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

For ‘elders’, it's, you would have heard this in my introduction as well: ‘balgabalgar-galang’ so ‘galang’ is the plural. So ‘elder’ is ‘balgabalga’ and ‘galang’ makes it ‘elders’.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Balambumbal

Pronounced: Bal-am-bum-bal

Means: The ancient ones/ancestors

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

And finally, ‘the ancient ones’, I always remember, if I'm in doubt about something that I'm doing or something I'm going to do, and whether or not it's a good idea, particularly if it's going to potentially be a negative action or negative language towards someone, I think to myself, what would the old people, what would the ancient ones, our ancestors, what would they think? And so the ‘ancient ones’, the word for that is ‘balambumbal’ - ‘Balambumbal’.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is Anita Heiss, smiling whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Wiradjuri: Mandaang guwu

Pronounced: Mun-dung goo

Means: Thank you

Source: Wiradjuri Dictionary App, developed by the Wiradjuri Study Centre.

Anita Heiss: ­

I'm going to sign off now and say ‘mandaang guwu’. Thank you for listening.

Text on screen: ­

The Our words, our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra.

(Telstra logo, State Library of Queensland logo, Queensland Government logo)

Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

Robert Ah Wing: ­

The Our words, our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra. Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

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The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages.

(International Year of Indigenous Languages logo)

Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language, heritage and knowledge always remains with the traditional owners, elders, language custodians and other community members of the respective language Nation.

Robert Ah Wing: ­

The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages. Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language, heritage and knowledge always remains with the traditional owners, elders, language custodians and other community members of the respective language Nation.

Text on screen: ­

Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following:

Anita Heiss

Robert Ah Wing - Logan City Council Libraries’ Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer

Queensland Narrating Service - for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance

Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group.

This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Gregg Dreise.

Robert Ah Wing: ­

Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following: Anita Heiss; Robert Ah Wing (Logan City Council Libraries’ Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer); the Queensland Narrating Service for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance; and the Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group.

This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Gregg Dreise.

Text on screen: ­

For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children.

(Logan City Council Logo)

Copyright 2019 Logan City Council.

Robert Ah Wing: ­

For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children. Copyright 2019 Logan City Council.

End of transcript