Aunty Dorothy transcript

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The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

Wendy Barling:

The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

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Deadly Digital Communities logo with handprint.

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

Robert Ah Wing:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

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Our words our stories

(Nagl Punh Ya, Ngal Punh Gedtha)

Lagau Danailag: My Island Story

by Aunty Dorothy Buhmann

Recorded on the 11th of December 2019

Robert Ah Wing:

Our words our stories. My Island Story by Aunty Dorothy Buhmann. Recorded on the eleventh of December 2019.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

Text on Screen:

Lagau Danailag: My Island Story

by Aunty Dorothy Buhmann

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

Kapu Kut. Good afternoon. Unggunel (my name) Dorothy Buhmann, nee Mairu.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a map of the Torres Strait Islands, highlighting the traditional languages.

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Torres Strait Island Traditional Languages map

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

I Badulag from Badu Island.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). There is a photo of stingray swimming near the bottom of the ocean floor.

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Aunty Dorothy’s totem is Kaigus (stingray)

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

Mother tribe, Argan. Kaigus: Stingray is my totem.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

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Aunty Dorothy has lived in the City of Logan for over 25 years. Her children and grandchildren also live in the city.

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

I live in Logan for more than 25 years with four children that were all raised, born and raised here, at Logan.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a map of the Torres Strait Islands, highlighting the traditional languages.

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Torres Strait Island Traditional Languages

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

My language: Kala Lagaw Ya. I talk three languages – Kala Lagaw Ya, which is my language. Then Creole. Creole is the language that everybody used, all the islands used. This is, consists of English and language, and English was our third language.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

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Torres Strait Creole: Esso

Means: Thank you (respect)

Pronounced: Es-so

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

Language talk. Thank you: Esso: which is respect.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

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Kala Lagaw Ya: La Kai Nae

Means: See you later

Pronounced: La-kai nae

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

La Kai Nae: when you see someone. And when someone have a yarn with you and then they leave you, they left. Then you say, ‘La Kai Nae’, which means ‘see you later’.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

Text on screen:

Kala Lagaw Ya: Kapu moeygibathynga

Means: Good morning

Pronounced: ka-pu moey-gi-ba-thy-nga

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann

Kapu moeygibathynga: Good morning

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

Text on screen:

Kala Lagaw Ya: Kapu Kut

Means: Good afternoon

Pronounced: Ka-pu kut

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

Kapu kut, Good Afternoon. Kapu means good.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

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Lagau Danailag: My Island Story

By Aunty Dorothy Buhmann

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

I learn to speak my language when I was born. Kedthamaikai, everybody was talking language where I come from. When I was going to school we were not allowed for talk languages in school, so we quickly learned for talk, Creole. Now I think they were trying to put the language in the class for today's generation.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is a map of the Torres Strait Islands, highlighting the traditional languages.

Text on Screen

Torres Strait Island Traditional Languages

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann

I went to primary school at Badu Island till up to grade 7 at the time, and then we need to go to Thursday Island for high school from grade 8 to 10.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

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Lagau Danailag: My Island Story

By Aunty Dorothy Buhmann

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

And after that, after I did my grade 10, I was done a traineeship for a kindergarten teacher, which was called then kindergarten teacher. They sent me down with a couple of other girls from the other islands to do that. I'm a nurse. I did my training at Thursday Island Hospital. Those days you just go and hands-on, none of this certificate thing. Now, when I came back down here, when I came down to Brisbane, I still practiced nursing and I have to train to get that certificate at Perth and Sydney to get my certificate, which is very important now to have that certificate. And I worked at Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Clinic for 25 years and now retired.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of the Logan Hospital.

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Image credit: POC/shutterstock.com

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann:

I was asked to be interpreter at Logan Hospital because there's still some old people who don't understand English. And they that's why they want me to come in and sit with the people, with our Island people, Torres Strait people at the hospital, when the doctors telling them something. As we know, doctors, they talk in their language and the community people don't understand. Well our people don't understand, they just go, “yes, yes, yes. No, no, no”.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

Text on screen:

Lagau Danailag: My Island Story

By Aunty Dorothy Buhmann

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann

OK.  I talk at home. I talk everyday with my de facto husband and families around us. And then I talk English for my children and my grandchildren and little bit of Creole. But they understand when I talk to them. Language, it's important! Because, that's the only way the old people talk, and if I want to learn something, I need to talk to them in language. It's very important because they can't talk, the old people can't talk English. So I would like them to learn language, but it’s very different down here! In  Brisbane, especially in Brisbane.  Like all their friends are talking English and not many children talking language. I think it's getting lost somewhere, because our young people insist on. It’s just me down here in Brisbane, at Torres Strait they might be different. Down here I can't see the kids, the children, my children, my grandchildren talking language. Because all their friends are talking English and you know, if they want to find out something, they look at Google!  

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of a smiling Aunty Dorothy Buhmann wearing a black, orange and white patterned dress.

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Kala Lagaw Ya: Kima Esso

Means: Big Thank-you

Pronounced: Ki-ma Es-so

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann

Kima Esso.

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The Our words our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra.

(Telstra logo, State Library of Queensland logo, Queensland Government logo)

Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

Robert Ah Wing:

The Our words our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra. Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

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The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous languages.

(International Year of Indigenous Languages logo)

Robert Ah Wing

The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous languages.

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Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language heritage and knowledge always remains with the Traditional Owners, Elders, language custodians and other community members of their respective language Nation. While there is much language material in the public domain, it is important to engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members, language custodians and Elders to find out more about language and culture.

Robert Ah Wing:

Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language heritage and knowledge always remains with the Traditional Owners, Elders, language custodians and other community members of their respective language Nation. While there is much language material in the public domain, it is important to engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members, language custodians and Elders to find out more about language and culture.

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Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following:

Aunty Dorothy Buhmann, Uncle Jacob Luffman

Robert Ah Wing - Logan City Council Libraries’ Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer

Queensland Narrating Service - for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance

Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group.

This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Gregg Dreise.

Robert Ah Wing:

Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following: Aunty Dorothy Buhmann; Uncle Jacob Luffman; Robert Ah Wing - Logan City Council Libraries Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer; the Queensland Narrating Services for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance; the Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group. This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Gregg Dreise.

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For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children.

(Logan City Council logo)

Copyright 2019. Logan City Council.

Robert Ah Wing:

For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children.  Copyright 2019. Logan City Council.

End of transcript