Aunty Jeanette transcript

Start of transcript

Text on screen:

The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

Wendy Barling:

The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo with handprint.

Text on screen:

Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

Robert Ah Wing:

Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

Text on screen:

Our words our stories
A language story by Aunty Jeanette Fabila
Recorded on the 19th of October 2019

Robert Ah Wing:

Our words our stories

A language story by Aunty Jeanette Fabila

Recorded on the 19th of October 2019

Description: ­

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is holding a bunch of gum leaves. Aunty Jeanette is standing in front of acrylic on glass artwork panels by Joshua Cutmore, which are located in the Nyeumba-Meta space at Logan Central Library. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by another image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila holding gum leaves displayed on the right side.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

Hello, my name is Jeanette Fabila, and I'm here to discuss with you and have a nice little chat with you, about reconnecting through the language of dance.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding a bunch of gum leaves. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with gum leaves.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

Because I suppose as a little girl, I have always been interested in the drums.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an map of Papua New Guinea and the top of Queensland, Australia, focusing on the Torres Strait Islands.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

I grew up in Papua New Guinea, finding that my great grandmother was actually brought up in the Torres Strait Islands and became one of the first missionaries in Papua New Guinea. So I questioned a lot because our family in Papua New Guinea knew certain songs that not a lot of Papua New Guineans knew, and one of those songs was Old TI, My Beautiful Home. So since growing up, that has been I suppose a song that has reconnected me with where my great grandmother was taken from. Since my journey through dance, I have then found that she was actually taken from the area of Beagle Bay in Western Australia.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an map of a part of Western Australia, with a pinpoint locating where Beagle Bay is.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

And they are part of the Jabbar Jabbar nation, which I am really proud to continue searching and finding my dance of that area.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding palm fronds. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with palm fronds.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

And it's taken me 25 to 40 years of my dance career, growing up as a little girl, learning a lot of various different dances from Polynesian to Contemporary.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding palm fronds. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with palm fronds.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

I was very lucky finally to find a place called NAISDA College of Dance, where I met a lot of my brothers and sisters, who were also from Stolen Generation, who all went there and we were kind of a melting pot of people reconnecting through dance, song, music and storytelling.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is holding a bunch of gum leaves. Aunty Jeanette is standing in front of acrylic on glass artwork panels by Joshua Cutmore, which are located in the Nyeumba-Meta space at Logan Central Library. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by another image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila holding gum leaves displayed on the right side.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

I suppose very luckily, I was in the era of watching Bangarra Dance Company being born. Also, the Aboriginal Islander Dance Company, back then, was also another company that was birthed.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is holding a bunch of gum leaves. Aunty Jeanette is standing in front of acrylic on glass artwork panels by Joshua Cutmore, which are located in the Nyeumba-Meta space at Logan Central Library. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by another image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila holding gum leaves displayed on the right side.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

Christine Anu came through as a singer; Ningali Lawford, my sister, who has now passed on to the spirit world recently - a brilliant actor who was able to pass on stories and knowledge of the Western Australian culture, and has always been an inspiration to me. Because I've been still searching for my great grandmother, Rosie Bombay, her country and where I feel the spirits have been continuously leading me to find her, with little messages through my dance career.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding palm fronds. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with palm fronds.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

As I've travelled over 30 years so far, and I continue passing on my knowledge and skills through dance to reconnect the next generation, who I feel have lost a lot of their connection to their own countries.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding palm fronds. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with palm fronds.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

And when we come together as a family, through dance, we're able to build a spirit that we can't see but we feel it as a family group of going through, I suppose, loss and finding ourselves, and building pride of who we are as Aboriginal children.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding palm fronds. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with palm fronds.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

And, and really being proud of our country and reconnecting and trying to maintain what we have left.

As an Indigenous contemporary choreographer, performer and dancer, I've been very lucky to grow up in the Logan area.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding gum leaves. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with gum leaves.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

Everybody calls us Logan Bogans, but I think we're getting out there and getting more proud because we're building a lot of dance groups in our schools. It's taken a lot of time, maybe 20 years, to build little groups in our local schools.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding gum leaves. Aunty Jeanette is standing in front of acrylic on glass artwork panels by Joshua Cutmore, which are located in the Nyeumba-Meta space at Logan Central Library. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by another image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila holding gum leaves displayed on the right side.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

And I've been very lucky also with my work to travel all the way up to Jinibara country and revive their dances and language as well. I've been very privileged to represent the Nunukul dance group as well, and learning about their traditional dances and songs.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding gum leaves. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with gum leaves.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

And being able to reconnect children from the Logan area with their own elders, some of the traditional dancers from this area and also the Yugambeh Country as well. When the Commonwealth Games was in town that was a great time for all of us to share dances throughout this area and also with the north of Queensland.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding palm fronds. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with palm fronds.

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

So yes, Logan maybe not very well advertised as a great town, but within the town we have still got a spirit that we are still maintaining for our next generation to carry on and pass on the awareness, because there are a lot of visitors coming into our country, and we need our next generation to be able to be there to educate them on our cultural ways.

Description:

Deadly Digital Communities logo on left hand side followed by an image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila with white body paint on her arms and face. She is wearing a braided headpiece with white feathers over her forehead, and has white body paint in her long dark hair. She is doing dance movements whilst holding palm fronds. The words “The language of dance” and “Aunty Jeanette Fabila” are displayed in the centre of the screen, followed by a different image of Aunty Jeanette Fabila dancing with palm fronds.  

Aunty Jeanette Fabila:

Especially with our visitors walking from Turrubul country all the way through Jagera, all the way down to Yugambeh country across through to Nunukul, Stradbroke Island. And being aware that we are a very diverse nation and we are very proud to share, if people are willing to listen and learn from us. So I suppose a great thing to do is to look, listen and keep learning.

Text on screen:

The Our words our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities Program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra.

(Telstra logo, State Library of Queensland logo, Queensland Government logo)

Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

Robert Ah Wing:

The Our words our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities Program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra. Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

Text on screen:

The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages.

(International Year of Indigenous Languages logo)

Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language, heritage and knowledge always remains with Traditional Owners, Elders, language custodians and other community members of the respective language Nation.

Robert Ah Wing:

The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages. Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language, heritage and knowledge always remains with Traditional Owners, Elders, language custodians and other community members of the respective language Nation.

Text on screen:

Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following:

Aunty Jeanette Fabila

Robert Ah Wing - Logan City Council Libraries’ Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer

Queensland Narrating Service - for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance

Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group

This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Gregg Dreise.

Robert Ah Wing:

Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following: Aunty Jeanette Fabila; Robert Ah Wing (Logan City Council Libraries’ Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer): the Queensland Narrating Service for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance; and the Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group.

This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Gregg Dreise.

Text on screen:

For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children.

(Logan City Council Logo)

Copyright 2019 Logan City Council.

Robert Ah Wing:

For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children. Copyright 2019 Logan City Council.

End of transcript