Aunty Margaret transcript

Start of transcript

Text on screen:

The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

Wendy Barling:

The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

Text on screen:

Deadly Digital Communities logo with handprint.

Text on screen:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

Robert Ah Wing:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

Text on screen:

Our words our stories

Bajuk the frog.

A Gunggari story by Aunty Margaret Finlay.

Recorded on the 19th of June 2019.

Robert Ah Wing:

Our words our stories

Bajuk the frog.

A Gunggari story by Aunty Margaret Finlay.

Recorded on the 19th of June 2019.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is an image of Aunty Margaret Finlay.

Text on screen:

Gamilaraay: Yowallah

Pronounced: Yow-a-la

Means: Hello

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

Yowallah.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).   

Text on screen:

Gunggari language by Margaret Finlay

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

My name is Margaret Finlay and I am the niece of Irene Ryder nee Foster.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of Irene Ryder and her great-niece Reeghan Finlay.

Text on screen:

Irene Ryder and her great-niece Reeghan Finlay show off the card packs printed in the Gungarri language.

Photograph: Blake Antrobus, The Western Star, 26 November, 2015.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

Irene May Ryder was born in Mitchell on the 12th May 1941, and she is the eleventh child of George and Mabel Foster. She married Lindsay Ryder in 1965. She grew up on the banks of the Yumba at Mitchell, and used to sit around and listen to the elders talking language, and picked up on this language.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is image of the Yumba Museum in the old schoolhouse.

Text on screen:

Yumba Museum in the old schoolhouse, Mitchell

Photograph: Aunty Margaret Finlay, 2019

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

Irene lived at the Yumba from 1941 to 1968 and attended Yumba School in 1947 and 1948, and then moved into the township of Mitchell in 1968.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of the Ulldi Carpet Snake.

Text on screen:

Irene Ryder’s totem is the Ulldi Carpet Snake

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

Irene will always regard the Yumba as home and her totem is “Ulldi”, the carpet snake.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a map of south-east Queensland, highlighting the Maranoa area, including Mitchell.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

And when we talk about the Yumba, it's a small reserve where Aboriginal people were forced to live in the nineteen hundreds. It's three k's out of Mitchell. It was closed down in 1968. But now, the Gunggari people have the Yumba, and had the original school back there and trying to get a museum up and running. But they haven't got it yet, but they've got some artefacts and that back, and language stored. Irene started coming to visit St Patrick's in 1985 to teach children the Gunggari language and culture.

She has been an important link between school and community. There's a strong history of Aboriginal culture in Mitchell. The Aboriginal people have occupied the Maranoa area for a minimum of nineteen thousand years.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is an image of Irene Ryder and her great-niece Reeghan Finlay.

Text on screen:

Irene Ryder and her great-niece Reeghan Finlay show off the card packs printed in the Gungarri language.

Photograph: Blake Antrobus, The Western Star, 26 November, 2015.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

Aunty Irene was a big influence in Mitchell with language. She took great interest in this, and recorded many Gunggari women - and men. Irene has written a number of stories which helped the community learn more about the Gunggari language, and also keep the Gunggari language alive amongst the younger children. Aunty Irene used to go into both schools - the State School and St Patrick's School in Mitchell - to teach language. She was very passionate about her language.

Some activities that Aunty Irene taught within the schools: Language Rounders - we used to play rounders at the school, and this is the State School and St Patrick's. Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes - That was an activity that said the language word for Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes, and the kids enjoyed this.

She has been very instrumental in preserving our language from Mitchell.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is the logo for the Yugambeh Museum Language and Heritage Research Centre, and an image of the Yugambeh app for the museum.

Text on screen:

W: yugembeh.com/

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

Some of the languages at Yugambeh Museum, you know, a lot of it's recorded. And also they have written other books, just for kids.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is the front cover for the story, Sam the Frog (Bajuk), written by Irene Ryder.

Text on screen:

Sam the Frog (Bajuk)
Story by Irene Ryder
Picture by Students of St Patricks School
Mitchell

This is available as a free online eBook at the State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

Irene wrote the story of Bajuk the Frog and offered it to the students of St Patrick's to illustrate, during the NAIDOC Week celebrations in 1999. The staff and students took it as one of their projects. The result was this beautifully illustrated book. It will be a valuable resource in the early childhood area of the school. The front cover of the book was illustrated by Irene's great-nephew, Damian Finlay.

This story book is for everyone to enjoy and everyone to learn our language. So now we will read the story of Bajuk the Frog.

Sam the Frog (Bajuk) was written by Irene Ryder, a Gunggari elder, who developed the text to help teach the Gunggari language to teachers in the Mitchell area of Queensland. The book was illustrated by the students of St Patrick's School, Mitchell where Irene had been visiting and teaching since 1985.

The front cover picture was a work of Irene's great-nephew Damian Finlay.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a frog, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Bajuk
Pronounced: But-cha
Means: Frog

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

Sam the Frog (Bajuk). Sam the Frog (Bajuk) was hopping down to the river to find his girlfriend, Alice the bajuk.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a dog, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Nuton
Pronounced: Noo-rah
Means: Dog

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

He met a dog (Nuton). The nuton sniffed at the Bajuk and said "Bow Wow".

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a frog, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Bajuk
Pronounced: But-cha
Means: Frog

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

On went the bajuk hopping.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of an emu, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Nuryn
Pronounced: Noo-run
Means: Emu

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

He met two emus (Nuryn).

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a snake, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Bumbara
Pronounced: Bum-Bah-rah
Means: Snake

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

And a snake (Bumbara) under a tree. The bajuk stopped and had a spell too.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a frog, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Bajuk
Pronounced: But-cha
Means: Frog

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

On went the bajuk hopping.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a crow, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Wadha
Pronounced: Wah-doo
Means: Crow

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

He met some crows (Wadha). They tried to pick at him so the bajuk had to hop very fast.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a frog, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Bajuk
Pronounced: But-cha
Means: Frog

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

On went the bajuk hopping.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a group of children jumping into the air, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Aundua
Pronounced: Un-dah-noo
Means: Children

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

He met some children (Aundua) playing rounders and making lots of noise.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a frog, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Bajuk
Pronounced: But-cha
Means: Frog

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

On went the bajuk hopping. On went the bajuk hopping.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a frog, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Maral
Pronounced: Mar-rul
Means: Sand goanna

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

On his way he met a sand goanna (Maral).

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is a silhouette of a frog, in front of a grey background.

Text on screen:

Gunggari: Bajuk
Pronounced: But-cha
Means: Frog

Original Artwork by the students can be viewed in the ePublication from State Library of Queensland. Go to: slq.qld.gov.au and search the catalogue for Irene Ryder, Bajuk, or Sam the frog.

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

On went the bajuk hopping as he saw the river ahead. Sam the bajuk was so happy to see his girlfriend, Alice the bajuk that they danced around in a circle. The End.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is

Text on screen:

Gunggari language by Margaret Finlay

Aunty Margaret Finlay:

Language is very important and we've been preserving the Gunggari language and documenting language, teaching kids in school language but I would also like to acknowledge the library and Robert Ah Wing for recording this, so we can keep it for generations to come. Thank you.

Text on screen:

The Our words our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra.

(Telstra logo, State Library of Queensland logo, Queensland Government logo)

Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

Robert Ah Wing:

The Our words our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra. Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

Text on screen:

The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous languages.

(International Year of Indigenous Languages logo)

Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language heritage and knowledge always remains with the Traditional Owners, Elders, language custodians and other community members of their respective language Nation.

Robert Ah Wing:

The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous languages. Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language heritage and knowledge always remains with the Traditional Owners, Elders, language custodians and other community members of their respective language Nation.

Text on screen:

Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following:

(Aunty) Irene Ryder

(Aunty) Margaret Finlay

Robert Ah Wing - Logan City Council Libraries Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer

Queensland Narrating Service - for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance

Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group.

This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Gregg Dreise.

Robert Ah Wing:

Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following:

Aunty Irene Ryder and her niece, Aunty Margaret Finlay; Robert Ah Wing,  Logan City Council Libraries Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer; the Queensland Narrating Service for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance; the Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group.

This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Gregg Dreise.

Text on screen:

For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children.

(Logan City Council logo)

Copyright 2019. Logan City Council.

Robert Ah Wing:

For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children.

Copyright 2019. Logan City Council.

End of transcript