Derek Oram Sandy transcript

Start of transcript

Text on screen:

The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

Wendy Barling:

The views and opinions expressed in this recording do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Logan City Council. Logan City Council does not make any representation of the accuracy of any such views and opinions.

Text on screen:

Deadly Digital Communities logo with handprint.

Text on screen:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

Robert Ah Wing:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers and listeners should be aware that this narrated story may contain names, images and voices of deceased people.

Text on screen:

Our words our stories

A Yuggera language story by Derek Oram Sandy from the Yerongpan Dancers

Recorded on the 15th of June 2019

Robert Ah Wing:

Our words our stories

A Yuggera language story by Derek Oram Sandy from the Yerongpan Dancers

Recorded on the 15th of June 2019

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is Derek Oram Sandy and Walter Oram, standing next to each other with their arms over each other’s shoulder, whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Yuggera Language

Derek Oram Sandy

Walter Oram

Derek Oram Sandy:

(Derek greets listeners in the Yuggera language.)

That means good morning in the local language here of the Yuggera people where I'm doing this recording. The Yuggera language group stretches from the south of the Caboolture River down towards the north of the Logan River then out towards the foothills of Warwick and Toowoomba. That's where the Yuggera language was spoken. Here in Australia we have over fifteen hundred Aboriginal languages and dialects right across this country, so the Yuggera language group is one of those languages.

On my mother's side I descend from the Yuggera language group; and also the Yugambeh language group which is south of the Logan River and then down towards the Tweed River; as part of the Mununjali people and the Wanggeriburra people of that Yugambeh language group.

So those are the two language groups that I descend from on my mother's side. My father's side is from Central Queensland, part of the Dharumbal language group; Gangalu language group and out towards the west of Rocky (Rockhampton), in that Birri Gubba language group out there. So those are the languages that make up who I am and I'm here to share a bit of my journey. What language words mean to me, and I'm going to share with you guys some of the language words that I've learnt from elders and family over my journey.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top).  In the centre of the screen is Derek Oram Sandy and Walter Oram, standing next to each other with their arms over each other’s shoulder, whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Yuggera: Jimbulang

Pronounced: JIM-buh-LUNG

Means: Family

Derek Oram Sandy:

So, the first word is ‘jimbulang. ‘Jimbulang means ‘family’. I held that very close to my heart. Family is a very important thing for us Aboriginal people, and also Torres Strait Islander people. Because when we look into our dark history of the Stolen Generation, and things like, that we have people get taken away from Country and away from their families. You know that word, family, is very important and we are coming back to that family way. So the word ‘jimbulang it means ‘family’, and I’ve heard it at many different family meetings and gatherings and stuff like that. So I hold that language word very close.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Derek Oram Sandy and Walter Oram, standing next to each other with their arms over each other’s shoulder, whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Yuggera: Nanni dhargun

Pronounced: NUN-nee DHAR-gun

Means: See country

Derek Oram Sandy:

Next couple of words ‘nanni dhargun’. ‘Nanni meaning ‘see’; ‘dhargun meaning ‘the country’. So ‘nanni dhargun’, which is something we used to use as a family because I had a real big family.

I was the eldest and there was four; three other brothers below me and one sister. So growing up we lived in low economic places like Logan, Ipswich, Acacia Ridge, Inala all those type of places. Living in those areas we'd get real bored we would start to want to go out to the bush and go camping, and get out of those areas for a while. So when my mum and dad used to take us out bushwalking or take us rainforest walking on Country or places like that, and visit certain areas, we would always say ‘nanni dhargun’. Which means, ‘we'll go and see Country’ as Custodians, and go and see all those stories that are within our Country. And we can see with the plants, animals and the trees. So that's what we would call ‘nanni dhargun’, means ‘go and see Country’.

Description:

On the left is a colour photograph of a black and white Peewee bird perched on a metal pole.

Text on screen:

Yuggera: Bilin

Pronounced: BILL-Lin

Means: Peewee

Derek Oram Sandy:

Another one I'd like to finish on because I descend from The Yerongpan clan group of the Yuggera language group of my grandfather, great-great grandfather, Bilin. ‘Bilin meaning the ‘Peewee’. Bulimba area named after him. That particular area is where my grandfather looked after and that was his role as part of the tribal headman of Yerongan clan group. So that's the clan group I represent.

Description:

On the left is the Deadly Digital Communities logo (comprising of the words and a large white handprint on the top). In the centre of the screen is Derek Oram Sandy and Walter Oram, standing next to each other with their arms over each other’s shoulder, whilst wearing a black printed t-shirt featuring the white Deadly Digital Communities logo.

Text on screen:

Yuggera: Nanni ngin

Pronounced: NUN-nee NIJ-in

Means: See you later

Derek Oram Sandy:

And we say the words ‘nanni ngin’: ‘Nanni ngin’ means ‘see you’, ‘see you later’, as we never say goodbye as Aboriginal people. So when I say ‘nanni ngin’ that means ‘I'll see you fellows next time’ or ‘I'll talk to you later on’. Because we never say goodbye unless we send our family or friend’s spirit to rest in the sky country so we always say ‘nanni ngin’, which means: ‘I'll see you next time we gather’, or next time we come across paths. So that's something that we always say as family, to one another, as Yerongpan-Yuggera people.

I also descend from Miguntyun clan group which is on the northern parts of Brisbane. Those are part of my story, my journey.

Description:

On the left is a colour photograph of a dark Koel cuckoo bird with a red eye, standing on a tree branch.

Text on screen:

Yuggera: Toowong

Pronounced: TOO-wong

Means: Koel cuckoo bird

Derek Oram Sandy:

Some of the suburbs we have: ‘Toowong’: the ‘storm bird’; and the ‘Koel cuckoo’ is the Toowong-St Lucia area’s spiritual totem.

(DEREK MAKES THE CALL OF THE KOEL CUCKOO, TWICE)

That's the sound that the animal makes and that sound has a story which was taught to me by Uncle Desmond Sandy; and that story talks about that particular area of the storm bird and the one that lets us know when the rain's coming, from the west into the bay.

Description:

Colour photograph of Derek Oram Sandy playing the digeridoo in an outdoor bush setting, with the Yerongpan logo in the right-hand corner.

Text on screen:

Yolngu: Yidaki

Pronounced: YID-ar-KEY

Means: Didgeridoo

Yuggera: Buran Mundo

Pronounced: BOR-ran mah-un-DOO

Means: Buran (Wind) Mundo (Hollow log)

Derek Oram Sandy:

So I would like to play a bit of ‘Yidaki’ or ‘didgeridoo’ and I want to play and share the sounds of a way of expression, listening to the sounds of language words and animals and totems. By understanding that, that's a way of expression and telling stories as well which is through that instrument. And you'll probably hear the ‘Toowong’, also, that ‘storm bird’.

(DEREK PLAYS THE DIDGERIDOO)

Text on screen:

The Our words our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra.

(Telstra logo, State Library of Queensland logo, Queensland Government logo)

Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

Robert Ah Wing:

The Our words our stories project is a Deadly Digital Communities program supported through funding from the State Library of Queensland and Telstra. Dream big with State Library of Queensland and Telstra in partnership with Indigenous Knowledge Centres and local councils.

Text on screen:

The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous languages.

(International Year of Indigenous Languages logo)

Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language heritage and knowledge always remains with the traditional owners, elders, language custodians and other community members of their respective language nation.

Robert Ah Wing:

The Our words our stories project is in recognition of the United Nations International Year of Indigenous languages. Logan City Council Libraries acknowledges that language heritage and knowledge always remains with the traditional owners, elders, language custodians and other community members of their respective language nation.

Text on screen:

Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following:

Derek Oram Sandy - Yerongpan Dancers

Walter Oram - Yerongpan Dancers

Robert Ah Wing - Logan City Council Libraries’ Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer

Queensland Narrating Service - for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance

Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group.

This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Derek Oram Sandy.

Robert Ah Wing:

Logan City Council gratefully acknowledges the time, resources, stories and support of the following:

Derek Oram Sandy (Yerongpan Dancers); Walter Oram (Yerongpan Dancers); Robert Ah Wing (the Logan City Council Libraries’ Deadly Digital Communities Project Officer; the Queensland Narrating Service for providing digital recording equipment, sound production and quality assurance; and the Nyeumba-Meta Advisory Group.

This recording features didgeridoo music performed by Derek Oram Sandy.

Text on screen:

For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children.

(Logan City Council logo)

Copyright 2019. Logan City Council.

Robert Ah Wing:

For Mobo Jarjum - tomorrow's children.

Copyright 2019. Logan City Council.