Safe places and spaces

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design

We design city spaces that improve safety and reduce crime using the principles of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED).

Crime-prevention design can be applied to houses, parks, toilet blocks, public areas and car parks. For more information, please download the Crime prevention through environmental design fact sheet (PDF 8.2 KB).

The Logan Planning Scheme 2015 includes a policy on crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED). This policy provides guidelines that developers must follow to ensure that new developments meet crime-prevention design principles.

For more information, please call us on 07 3412 4608 or email us at safecity@logan.qld.gov.au.

Be an active bystander - Eyes and Ears Out and About

Getting out in your local neighbourhood is great for you and your dog and if you keep your Eyes and Ears Out and About, it could be great for the safety of your local community too.

If you see a crime being committed or someone acting suspiciously next time you’re out and about - Don’t ignore it #Report It.

For more information about being an active bystander, download our Eyes and Ears Out and About flyer (PDF 481 KB).

If you see a crime being committed:

Call Triple Zero (000) immediately.

If you see graffiti, potholes or other damaged Council property:

  • call us on 07 3412 3412, or
  • report it online.

In a non-emergency situation:

  • call Policelink on 131 444
  • Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000
  • report online on the Police website
  • download the Policelink App and log the details. 

Safety in our Parks

The best way to keep our parks safe is to make sure that the community feel a sense of ownership and make full use of the park.

People are more likely to ‘protect’ a space if they have a connection and respect for that space. To do this, we need to make sure they feel empowered to respond to situations in a way that will enhance the safety and security of the community.

For more information, please download the Keeping our parks safe fact sheet (PDF 469 KB). You can also download and fill in our Community safety park audit template (PDF 353 KB) to report safety issues in parks.

Safety for Community and Sporting facilities

The best way to protect your City's community facilities is to identify, assess and put strategies in place to help reduce the risk of your organisation or club being impacted by crime.

For more information, download Keeping our community facilities safe fact sheet (PDF 730 KB). You can also download and fill in our Community facilities safety audit template (PDF 345 KB) to report safety issues in community and sporting facilities.

Safety around the home

People who commit break-ins are often opportunistic, meaning they will only commit a crime if the opportunity presents itself, like an open door or window or if valuables are in public view.

The best way to assess your home is to look at it through the eyes of a potential burglar. The following fact sheet is intended to help you find  steps you can take to reduce the opportunity for a crime to occur in and around your home. 

For more information, see Safety around the home .

Living in rural areas or near open space (parks)

While being surrounded by nature can be peaceful, there are many safety precautions residents living in rural areas or near open spaces should be aware of.

For more information, download our Living in rural area or near open spaces (Parks)(PDF 1.43 MB)   

Protecting your business

There are many types of business crime, the most common being:

  • shoplifting
  • robbery
  • burglary
  • malicious damage (i.e. graffiti and vandalism)
  • fraud.

The cost of these crimes on your business can extend far beyond the financial impact and may also affect the reputation of your business / brand and future sales.

It is important to identify, assess and put strategies in place to help reduce the risk of your business being impacted by crimes. The greater the likelihood of an offender being seen, challenged, or caught, the less likely it is that your business will be targeted.

Applying CPTED principles to your business may not eliminate crime, but it may help you to identify changes to your business to improve safety and security

For more information, download Crime prevention through environmental design fact sheet (PDF 8.2 KB) and Business crime prevention and incident reporting fact sheet (PDF 1.37 MB)..  

Construction crime prevention

Construction site crime is expensive, can delay project schedules and can also give your business a bad reputation!

Construction sites can often be 'easy targets' by opportunistic thieves as they can lack proper security and loss prevention practices.

For more information, download the Construction site crime prevention fact sheet (PDF 312 KB).