Funding new local infrastructure transcript

Start of Transcript

Text on screen:

A city scene with tall buildings in the background, trees and a park in the middle ground and a pipe and road in the foreground.  There is a large text box with the words ‘Funding new local infrastructure’ in it.

Narrator:

Did you know, it isn’t just rates that pay for infrastructure in Logan?

Text on screen:

The screen is divided into 6 equal sized squares. In each square is a picture of a type of Council infrastructure with a label.  The labels for the 6 squares are Water, Wastewater, Transport, Stormwater, Parks and Land for community facility.

Narrator:

Logan City Council delivers infrastructure across the following networks: Water, Wastewater, Transport infrastructure, like local roads and active transport, Stormwater, Parks and Land for community facilities.

Text on screen:

A map of Logan appears with people and then shops, houses, factories and other buildings popping up around the map to indicate development occurring.

Narrator:

With Logan growing fast and more development happening in the city, new infrastructure is always being delivered.

Text on screen:

The screen has 6 equal sized squares on it. 3 down each side and a single, large square in the middle. In each of the 6 squares are the same pictures as used previously with the labels for each type of Council infrastructure. Water, Wastewater, Transport, Stormwater, Parks and Land for community facilities.

In the large square in the middle are the words “Infrastructure Contributions”.

Narrator:

A major source of funding is infrastructure contributions.

Text on screen:

A pie chart is displayed to show where Council gets its revenue from. The following pieces are shown in increasing size, Grants, Environment and community charges, Rates, User Chargers and Developer Contributions. Developer contributions makes up about a third of the pie chart.

The pie chart is replaced with a map of Logan with many pieces of infrastructure popping up across the map. Pipes, roads, rain clouds, park play equipment are shown to represent the different infrastructure networks.

Narrator:

Infrastructure contributions make up about a third of Council’s revenue, and go towards delivering important assets across the whole city.

Text on screen:

A sack of money appears in the middle of the screen with pictures of Council’s infrastructure networks surrounding it with labels, Water, Wastewater, Parks, Transport, Stormwater and Land for community facilities. 

Narrator:

These contributions are how developers pay their way.

Text on screen:

Three images are shown. One is a sack of money with a full line bar, a second is a picture of infrastructure and the third is a picture of land.  The full line bar connected to the sack of money begins to reduce in size. Appearing to balance this reduction is a proportionate amount of growth in the two other pictures. These pictures illustrate that if a developer does not pay the full infrastructure charge they may have to compensate Council with either the land or the infrastructure.

Narrator:

In some instances, developers may even provide the actual infrastructure or land in instead of a charge.

Text on screen:

A picture of a man wearing a hard hat is at the top of the screen, Dan the Developer. Below this is a picture of several houses and below this a picture of a group of people. As the video progresses, extending out of the houses are several lines. These lines connect to labelled pictures of Council’s infrastructure networks, Water, Wastewater, Parks, Transport, Stormwater and Land for community facilities. As the video progresses further coins, symbolising money, drop out of Dan the Developer and are distributed to these same infrastructure networks. 

Narrator:

For example, let’s take Dan the Developer. He wants to build a new residential estate that will bring more families to the area. The new houses in the estate will need access to Council’s networks. The infrastructure charges paid by Dan will help Council manage the increased load on the networks.

Text on screen:

The screen has 6 equal sized squares on it. 3 down each side as well as a single, large square in the middle. In each of the 6 squares are the same pictures as used previously with the labels for each type of Council infrastructure, Water, Wastewater, Transport, Stormwater, Parks and Land for community facilities.

In the large square in the middle is a map of Logan with many pieces of infrastructure popping up across the map. Pipes, roads, rain clouds, park play equipment are shown to represent the different infrastructure networks.

Narrator:

And it will fund new infrastructure where it’s needed across the city.

Text on screen:

A picture of a house with a sack of money next to it. As the number of houses increases, the number of sacks increases accordingly. As the video progresses, on the bottom half of the screen are shown pictures of Council’s infrastructure networks with a corresponding bar lines to indicate each network’s capacity. As the video progresses the capacity is taken up and the number of houses and sacks of money also increase.

Narrator:

These charges can run from thousands to even millions of dollars for really big developments. The amount that developers pay is based on how much extra load is expected on Council’s networks.

Text on screen:

A quickly moving slide that shows a map of Logan with shops, houses, factories and other buildings on it. Appearing on the side of the map are the 6 squares representing Council’s infrastructure networks, Water, Wastewater, Transport infrastructure, Stormwater, Parks and Land for community facilities. As the video progresses further the map is replaced with a large yellow square with the following words on it “Infrastructure Contributions”.

Narrator:

As you can see, infrastructure contributions play an important role in our growing city. 

Text on screen:

A map of Logan appears with a big question mark in the middle of it. The question mark turns into the Logan City Council website (Logan.qld.gov.au).

Narrator:

If you want to know more about how things work? Visit the Logan City Council website.

End of transcript